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will also hear from president obama, who signed the deficit reduction measure into law, part of the deal to raise the debt ceiling. first, senate majority leader harry reid and republican majority leader mitch mcconnell will talk on the senate floor about the january fiscal deadline. >> since our country voted to return president obama to the white house, i have spoken often about compromise. i remain optimistic that, when it comes to our economy, when it comes to protecting middle-class families from a whopping tax hike, republicans and democrats will be able to find common ground. president dwight eisenhower, a republican, once said, "people talk about the middle of the road as though it were unacceptable. there have to be compromises. the middle of the road is all usable space." so said white house and higher. -- dwight eisenhower. too often, we face off, not realizing that the solution rests somewhere in the middle. i remind everyone of one fact. this congress is one vote away from avoiding a fiscal cliff for middle-class families and small businesses. we can solve the greatest econo
when people first signed that pledge, the federal budget deficit was $220 billion. this year, $1.1 trillion, how can you say nothing has changed? >> lots have changed. bush focused not on spending. the pledge only does certain things. the pledge makes tax increases more difficult at the state level, at the national level. you haven't had a republican vote for income tax since 1990 when bush threw away his presidency. 1993 tax increase, only on democratic votes. then no tax increases until 2009 when obama came in and raised taxes with obamacare. >> isn't this -- you are having republican is take a difficult pledge to cut taxes, isn't that like a quarterback saying they like taxes? >> it's a pledge not to increase taxes. people say why don't you toughen it. you don't want to change it because it is a simple guardrail. it doesn't solve the world's problems, it says no net tax increase. >> in your mind when someone signs it, how long are they committed to it? >> in writing when the person signs it as long as you are a congressman or senator. >> you are signing this for life? >> unles
to pay a little bit more to reduce the deficit. bill: what happens if they don't see a deal? 90% of americans will see a tax hike in 2013. and families that make between $40,000 and $65,000 will have to pay an extra $2,000 to washington, d.c. in taxes. martha: concerns over america's fiscal cliff have sent the markets lower in premarket trading. there is a look at where the dow is poised to open this morning. with the dow, the s & p and the nasdaq all trading lower. speaking of that, a new round of violent protests break out in egypt as police fired teargas into the crowds. here are some of those scenes. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab
. it is still about three times the average deficit under bush. let us go back to the clinton tax era. eileen anywhere between republican and libertarian. up -- yes i am not. i lean anywhere between republican and a libertarian. host: what do you make of republicans up on capitol hill -- to sort of a back off the tax pledge that he took when he ran for senate, saying he would not raise taxes. caller: if we are going to raise taxes my important thing is raising them on everybody. because if they try to strike a compromise where only the rich get taxed, then it gets more progressive. it is not a point to help the budget. we are right to raise taxes, raise them all the way down to where clinton had them. host: senators lindsey gramm represented peter king, talking publicly abandoning the pledge of democrats will talk seriously about entitlement reforms. rest in peace, grover norquist? there are not enough republican tax hikes -- republicans to hike taxes for obama. the left is doing its best to make tax hikes appear to be a foregone conclusion. that is their take on tax hikes. eddie, on our line
" and he joins me now. thanks for being with us now. we appreciate it. you compare the deficit to an insurance policy. you say it doesn't make you any richer in the short-term, but in the long-term, it is helpful. i want to actually put your statements up. you say let's agree to keep deficits very high for at least another year. and then let's buy an insurance policy against that debt crisis when we can really afford it. so lots of republicans and democrats out there would disagree greatly with you. say that america's ability to pay its debt is really important. how would you respond to them? >> right. i do think that there's a thing that's taken place in washington deficit reduction will stimulate us to enormous growth in 2013. the fact is what deficit reduction is, is tax increases and spending cuts, both of which take economic activity out of the economy. so this really is extremely similar to insurance. if i buy, say, flood insurance. what i'm doing is i'm paying a short premium in the short-term, to protect my house in the long-term. that's exactly what deficit reduction i
, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so, a requirement to do so. the foundation of national power is ultimately economic. in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is foundational. i think in the u.s. we have both an opportunity and requirement to get our house in order. i believe what hundreds of tatars and 435 members of the house will step up -- what 100 senators and 435 members of the house will step up. >> so we have america under control because of the amount of treasuries? >> [indiscernible] our position to the nine states is very, very decisive to strengthen our relationship. there is no intention for us to use this economic relationship and a different context. we are very satisfied. that's all. >> let me open up to the floor. with four microphones around the room. fast.going to go i will call on people whose names i don't know. but that is josh rogan from "the cable." >> thank you for your time today. i
approach to reducing the nation's deficit. let's bring in our panel. mary katharine ham editor-at-large of hot air.com and fox news contributor. peter mirijanian former advisor to the clinton-gore and gore-lieberman campaigns. when the president arrives at the white house to speak, he will have people behind him, ordinary americans who reached out to the white house and want their $2,000 middle class tax cut preserved. republicans are saying this is essentially a campaign stunt, a campaign appearance kind of event of the he won the election. he should get on the business of governing. what do you say? >> well, one quick observation, jon. i think what you're seeing, what i think is interesting the first social media presidency. this administration using technology and using social media to advance their agenda. but look, all presidents do this. george w. bush after his re-election famously said he has now the political capital he intend to use. so going to the public and going sort of over the head of congress is something democratic and republican presidents always do what they
senator pat toomey from pennsylvania. he was a member of the deficit reduction super committee last year that failed to agree on a plan. but he's been talking about this issue for a long, long time. good morning, senator. >> good morning. >> we just learned that president obama will be traveling to your backyard on friday to talk about the fiscal cliff and spending, and traveling to pennsylvania right now. is this a welcome visit as far as you're earned? >> as far as i'm concerned the president of the united states is always welcome in my state of pennsylvania. we welcome the president and look forward to his message, and i have some questions i'd like to-ish i hope he addresses. >> what questions? >> first of all the president seems absolutely determined to inflict a tax increase on the american people. two years ago he signed a bill that extended the current tax rates for two more years because he said the last thing you want to do is raise taxes in a weak economy. today the economy is weaker than it was two years ago. why in the world does he want to inflict that damage now? >> senato
which means lowering tax rates not necessarily deficit reduction. it is the same policy romney had. it is where they were before the election. they gotta wake up and see the election, change things and they actually have to meet democrats somewhere in the middle. >> bill: i would hope. i would hope. new york times this morning, front page of the business section in terms of closing loopholes, romney was never specific about which one. new york times is saying that they know -- now we know one of the ones they're targeting. the headline is a tax break once sacred is now seen as vulnerable. what they're talking about is the mortgage interest deduction. there was no doubt it is on the table. it is one they're targeting rather than raise tax rates on the wealthy, they're going to either limit or get rid of the mortgage interest deduction. which is the most popular one. >> the most popular one. politically difficult i think. that's really the problem with romney's entire approach that said we'll just create revenue
as republicans have been trying to do since 2005 when we passed the deficit reduction act. >> let me jump to that, because part of the intriguing thing here is the fact that congressman cole, he is doing something that the president said, that post election news conference and that is, you know, extend the tax cut for everyone, but the wealthy, and then, you know, after you get that done, and i don't know if you would be going along with that, but nevertheless, you know, go ahead, talk about this long-term deal that would involve possible cuts as i think you're getting at, you know, cuts to programs like medicare. is that something we could see taking shape here? >> you're talking about getting rid of redundancies. great example, 342 economic development programs that are in the federal government system. let's start cleaning up these redundancies. let's do some of these across the board cuts in discretionary spending. let's make certain that medicare and social security, which are trust funds, not entitlements, they're trust funds, that they meet their obligation to our seniors and near seniors.
deficit right now. it is the bridge to renewable energy, renewable energy will take a long time. if we can move to gas we get tremendous benefits in terms of cleaner energy on the way to renewable energy future. if we could get those things done, steve, this would be transformational for our economy but we have not been able to act on these things even though i said earlier there is wide bipartisan -- >> thank you. let me just try to poke holes in this. if we rollback time to just before the financial crisis you look at the u.s. deposition. douglas holtz-eakin was out there talking about that already. and john mccain and others have been but it is much worse today but if you look at the deck in a different way, look at private sector debt, the fact, forget government debt. before the financial crisis private-sector debt was 160% of gdp in the united states and despite averaging, back to 160% of gdp we are still in crisis mode, you had structural corruption between regulators and financial institutions and any place in the economy and a private sector event that led to a government response
.m. majority whip dick durbin will talk about the so-called fiscal cliff and deficit reduction at the center for american progress. fiscal cliff, a combination of those expiring tax provisions and budget cuts that could take place the beginning of the new you. they include the bush-era tax cuts and sequestration. live coverage starts at 1130 eastern also on c-span. we are likely to about the fiscal cliff during the senate session today getting underway at 10 a.m. eastern, just over a half hour from now. after the gavel and majority leader reid will be recognized to speak and will likely outlined the schedule for the day which could include debate on defense programs and policy, and possibly legislation to do with equal rights, people with disabilities. centers will us from 12:30-2:15 eastern for weeks the party meetings. live coverage of the senate and members gavel in right here on c-span2. right now some debate from the floor of the senate yesterday between majority leader reid and republican leader mitch mcconnell. d, w they talkede about potentialit't changes to filibuster rules. here's
krugman sounded a different note today in the "times" and is talking about this idea that cutting deficits is a number one priority. he writes supposedly any day now investors will lose faith in america's ability to come to grips with its budgets failures. when they do there will be a run on treasury bonds, interest will spike and the u.s. economy will plunge back into recession. this sounds plausible to many people because it's roughly speaking what happened to greece but we're not greece. he's saying while this is a real dynamic for some countries, it is not because of the way we fund ourselves, is that right, ben? >> that's right. i would say morning munnize not actually by given name. >> i didn't know that. >> he's right, we're not greece, we're a much larger economy. we can grow our way out of debts and deficits. we've got a ginormous economy. we had a huge black friday weekend. probably $600 billion for the total shopping over the holidays. the question is, as we get close and getting into december, if it looks like talks are breaking down and we have the same old lines on no tax inc
. it almost makes me upset. interest rates are going down because they can't get a hands l on the deficit because stocks are going down. that's the reality we're dealing with. consumer confidence this morning, listen, i'm worried about the fiscal cliff. i have my button on. anybody who tries to put words in the general public's mouth about the fiscal cliff, these confidence numbers dispel that notion that they're worried. they probably don't even really know the details. >> david kudlow, you are taking something of a risk-on strategy. you're going with the high-growth, high-dividend plays in this market, aren't you? >> yeah, we are. it's a strategy that's worked quite well p the uncertainty we've had over the fiscal cliff. with the positive economic data coming in, high-growth areas have done well for us. hi areas have helped diversify and steady the portfolio. >> you're not worried about impact that the fiscal cliff could have on the tax treatment of dividends out there? you get all these companies imposing early dividends, special dividends to try and slip it in before the end of the ye
and your party come to this debate with big deficit because you and president bush and dick cheney lied this country into war and you had a lot of lies on foreign policy about wmds. president bush even said once in may 2003 that we found the wmds in iraq. dick cheney and condoleezza rice talked about links to al qaeda in iraq. you've never made up for those huge, serious, significant lies in the arena of foreign policy. and now you're picking apart, you know, basically the very early and ultimately not misleading with regard to foreign policy decisions, statements that this diplomat made. >> one thing we're learning right now the meeting with ambassador rice and senator corker is happening as we speak so a little earlier than that noontime appointment. but the one thing we heard also from senator barrasso in the last hour was john considerry's name floated out and it would be easier for him to sail through. you had the opportunity to work with john kerry before. >> sure. >> when we hear about this, is that really what the game, as joy-ann said, this machiavellian game, basically let's g
this -- that is working, the employee does is retired, and his benefits. which would cut down the deficit, cut down just about everything you could think of perry taxes in half, property taxes would be cut. you would have a whole new system. guest: there are certainly a whole range of proposals like this on the table, to shift money around, especially money that has not been spent in the last decade on the wars. there are a whole range of things that can be done. the current situation, running annual deficits in the neighborhood of $1 trillion, it is quite clear there is going to have to be a whole range of things that is going to have to be done to get the whole -- the number down to something more palatable. host: pensacola, florida, republican. go ahead, laura perry -- laura. caller: first of all, if $1.20 trillion, right, it is over 10 years. is that a real cut or is it a cut in the projected increase? guest: it is a cut in the baseline, so the projected increase. a very good point. in one year, 2009, we increased spending by almost $1 trillion. it was not just a one-time shot. so, we can't cut it i
of the issues understood the solution to the deficit plan. >> what grows jobs in america are consumers spending money. and the average person needs that $2,000 in his pocket to drive the economy. saying that tax breaks for the rich drive consumers lower down to spend is like saying you could start your car by pouring gasoline on the hood. there's no proof, there's no factual data to support it. it's completely a sham to say that. >> and he's a business owner. we need more members of congress to sound like that. if the president is trying to achieve solidarity on raising the top tax rate, these are the voices that can come through for them with that message in a big way. an owner of an automobile supply company says she supports the plan even if it means her own personal rates will go up. . >> i would have higher tax rates, but r more important and more crucial, the middle class would be spending about $3,000 more. >> harry reid kept the focus on the president's winning campaign message of letting the tax cuts expire on incomes over $250,000 a year. >> the people who have done so well during thi
% of the trillion dollars deficit why risk slowing down the economy, which a lot of people say might happen if you increase taxes why slow the economy for such a collectively small amount of money? >> first thought don't think it is a small amount of money. we need a balanced approach. david: uribe 2% of the deficit unfunded if you do that. >> to look at the president's budget, what he proposes is raising $1.6 trillion proposing spending cuts as well, combination of which would put us on a sustainable path in the economy in the long run. what we should avoid doing is having gridlock, not extending the middle-class tax cuts would wish on our report today is if the middle-class tax cuts are not extended that will cause consumer spending to fall by $200 billion next year. that'll be an awfully big hit to the economy. liz: to a for somebody economic council, physically says middle-class tax cuts on consumer spending, everybody spends. how do we come to this agreement, we keep hearing left the tax cuts they now warren buffett came out with an op-ed in "the new york times" say saying we should make that
're willing to close tax loopholes to reduce the deficit, now we haven't yet seen that from congressional republican leaders, but we obviously are seeing it from prominent republicans you showed including senator graham and senator bob corker. >> question about two of those gentlemen here in a moment. cnn this morning talked to grover norquist, incumbents dare to break this pledge, dare to vote to raise taxes. the question was will he do it again? here's norquist. >> we would certainly highlight who has kept their commitment and who hasn't, but the point is historically the people who lose do so because the people in their state have figured that out. >> back to, i think, where you were going a moment ago, bob, it is interesting that when you look at the top two, two of the top republican senators we're talking about who are flirting to break this pledge, break with grover norquist and consider raising taxes on the wealthy they both face re-election in 2014. i'm talking about saxby chambliss and south carolina's lindsey graham. does that say to you that the political winds could be shifti
the plan to a bankruptcy judge on friday. sa they need to close a nearly $46 billion budget deficit. new york and new jersey need at least $71.3 billion to recover from the devastation of super storm sandy and prevent similar damage from future storms. this is according to the state's latest estimates. that total of course could grow. steve liesman has been crunching the newspaperup i numbers and hn the next hour. this is to try to build up some sort of protection, some massive floodwalls. governor cuomo was saying this would be like $9.1 billion to start building. >> questions about the future of the sec following mary shapiro's exit. elyse walter could run the agent until december 2013 when she would have to be renominated and reapproved by the senate. among the issues, and ongoing battle over regulating the $2.5 trillion money market fund industry, some 63 unfinished rule making requirements that are all part of dodd-frank and continuing fears of course about market stability and high frequency trading. p. >> money markets used to be covered by the fdic when the crisis first came on.
of the deficit. that's an economic fact. >> we've been open to revenue by closinging loopholes as long as it's tied to spending cuts. >> as long as it's mitt romney's plan. that's what we're for. >> stephanie: what? you're acting like, it's almost like a hostage crisis. like they don't have the gun and are issuing demands. like what? >> what are you talking about? >> stephanie: exactly. mike in philadelphia, you're on the "stephanie miller show." hi, mike. >> caller: hi, steph how are you doing? >> stephanie: good, go ahead. >> caller: eric con tore brought obamacare back on the table. they won't leave that alone. >> stephanie: no, they are just the sorest losers in the world. it's like he won he won at the supreme court he won at the ballot box again moving on, we are not repealing obamacare. like really? the white house warned monday that american consumers will spend $200 billion less if the looming fiscal cliff is not averted and tax hikes are not spread across the board. the economy would take a hit of $500 billion, probably sending the country back boo recession. i get what the white h
not contributed to the deficit, and it shouldn't be part of the discussion. i think the press office said that the other day. we completely agree with that. we should set social security aside. it is solvent for decades, and by simply kicking in the social security tax above $250,000 you can make it solvent for decades more. so that's less of an issue i think in reality than it is in the long time republican desire to attack it whenever they can. remember, this is a party that tried to put it into the stock market just before the crash. >> i remember. >> so they have a long history of going after social security, and we have to, i think, set it aside. medicare is a more complicated problem because we have a health care system in this country that's immensely expensive, way too expensive, somewhere between $700 billion and $1 trillion a year by most standards, and 40% of that washes back through the federal budget. my position is that if we're going after the old folks on medicare and cutting their benefits, if we're going after the families who have a disabled child who couldn't take care
to the federal deficit. cutting it doesn't change the deficit or debt picture. a year or two of extra work, think progress writes may not seem like much with his cushy corner office. for a factory worker or janitor it can be real problems. life expectancy is longer. >> you can't afford a little hike in your taxes? really? >> stephanie: no. >> can i make a request? can we take justin on line one? i want to hear this. >> stephanie: okay. justin in huntington beach. you're on "the stephanie miller show." hi justin. >> caller: hey, guys, how you doing? i don't know if this makes me the world's best father or the world's worst father because my son and i basically raised him watching your show. so but what's really funny is every time he hears reince priebus, he says reince priebus. it doesn't matter whether it is on the radio or in the car. it is pretty hysterical. >> reince priebus. >> stephanie: i'm sorry. do it again justin. >> really loud. reince priebus. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: what's his name? >> his name is
revenue new tax revenue will have to be part of any deficit deal. i noticed mitch mcconnell's talked about tax rates. he's going to insist that tax rates not go any higher. you've got the mathematicians trying to raise the numbers. you can exact the rate throughout a person's entire income. they're looking for ways to finagle this. republicans are going to have to retreat and they're going to get a better deal before the end of the year than going into the new year. >> i want to ask you about that, what eleanor said about the end of the year rather than going into the new year. who benefits, if anyone, if they kick the can down the road, get a new congress. isn't there something to be said with this new democratic strength coming into the senate? it's a little stronger there. you have a stronger president picked up a few seats in the house. doesn't kicking the can down until february or march and do something that's maybe a bandaid now help the cost. >> it helps to a certain extent, but doesn't help the republican party all that much, because again, they're going to be blamed if we get a s
deficits it, to streamline our tax system. to do it in a balanced way. including asking the wealthiest americans to pay a little more. >> the problem with that strategy is that republic leaders are insisting that they don't want to take a framework for spending cuts down the road in exchange for tax changes now. they want it all done at the same time so that they can be sure that if taxes are going up on the rich, that in fact some of those spending cuts to bring down the debt will actually materialize. it might make it more likely to go of 00 cliff even though the president insisted today he thinks there will be a deal within weeks, shep. >> shepard: as for extending tax cuts for middle class americans it sounds like there is some agreement on that matter. >> it sounds like some republicans rank and file republicans are starting to turn away a little bit from speaker john boehner. tom coal rank and file member. is he part of the leadership but from oklahoma and basically said today extend them for the large majority for the middle class and come back and fight it out in january instea
does not address the debt problem. we don't know how much we address the deficit problem by closing loopholes. impasse. martha: we'll see where that goes. stuart, thanks very much. we'll talk to chris van hollen moments away. bob,er is also here today. we'll get to some of that with them. thanks, stuart. bill: some context from how far the revenue ending bush tax cuts would go. during the 2012 fiscal year it costs $9.7 billion a day to run the federal government. the additional revenue stopping bush tax cuts would bring in $82.4 billion. a number that would run the government for 8 1/2 days. senator corker says there is plan on the table for two years. martha: that grand bargain that was so close. we'll see where that is in terms of both sides. bill:. we're just getting started on this tuesday morning. how about this story? oh, my gosh, a toddler seconds away from almost certain death in this video as a car comes barreling around that bend. we'll show you what the rest of what happens here and we'll tell you what ended up happening. bill: there is new violence on the streets of key
wants to see. it is a $4 billion package of cuts to the deficit a combination of spending cuts and new revenue and about $2 trillion of that coming from getting rid of the bush tax cuts. at the same time while getting rid of the tax cuts for the wealthiest 2% of americans letting the tax cuts for 98% of americans continue because the middle class do need the help and the wealthiest people do not. so to get there of course, and by the way let's back up, right. the president put forth his plan on november 6th and mitt romney put forth his plan and the american people said no, we don't like that romney way of going which is to continue to coddle the rich. we agree with president obama. so now the negotiations are underway. about how to avoid going off the fiscal cliff. and what is the president doing? yesterday, he met with small business leaders. at the white house. the white house met with leaders of jack lew, the chief of staff. met with leaders of the chamber of commerce. today the president is meeting with so
revolution. we actually now have a path to energy independence in america, that's a $200 billion deficit right now. it's a bridge to renewable energy, renewable energy's going to take a long time. if we can move to gas, we'll get tremendous benefits in terms of cleaner energy on the way to renewable energy future. if we could get those things done, steve, this would be transformational for our economy. but we haven't been able to act on these things even though, as i said earlier, there's wide bipartisan consensus. >> thank you, michael. let me jump to doug and steve for a moment and just try to poke holes in this. if we roll back time to just before the financial crisis, you looked at the u.s. debt position, doug holtz-eakin was out there, you know, bitching about that already. [laughter] and john mccain and others had been. but it's much worse today. if you looked at debt in a different way, if you looked at private sector debt, if you looked at the fact -- forget government debt, but if you looked, government debt's gotten worse, but before the financial crisis, private sector debt wa
on the entrenched interests behind the spending that's killing a lot of states, is hurting our own federal deficit. so i think scott walker is someone who can say, look, i've done this, it was not easy, and i succeeded. as far as democrats are concerned, it's really a far less wide-open race, i think, than with republicans, simply because you have this hillary clinton decision out there, whether she does or doesn't. if she doesn't, i think you might have some democrats saying, you know, we won with the senator the last timing, but that's really, really unusual. governors are good. and martin o'malley of maryland, brian schweitzer of montana are two possibilities. >> greta: i think governor o'malley, a big choice, obviously someone people have their eyes on, but also cory booker, a mayor on the democratic side from newark, new jersey. we'll see a lot of corey booker. on the republican side, a woman, governor, suzanna martinez from the state of new mexico. i think she's someone to keep our eye on, because i think her speech at the republican national convention was one that wowed somebody. >> open r
officers, and teachers. and we're going to pay for that. no more deficit spending. we'll pay for it by having a surtax on people who make more than $1 million a year. and that surtax is .3%. they stopped it. they stopped it dead in its tracks. every republican voted against that. that is the way that they have legislated this entire year. and by our getting rid of the motion to proceed, that we're turning country upside-down is ridiculous. it's not true. they have legislated with the effort to defeat obama. he won. he won by 2 1/2 million votes, 325 -- 327 electoral votes, overwhelming. even though they did everything they could to stop him from being reelected. everyone knows what a failure this congress has been because of what the senate has done and that's nothing. nothing. no job creation. they didn't want that. it would -- if -- if we had had some ability to create jobs, it would have helped obama, it would have helped the country. but, no, that wasn't what they wanted to do. and a terrible day for them last year was the -- several months ago, the supreme court -- can y
to see them try different things. first of all, let's recognize the fact that we had the deficits right now as a result of obama's budget. that's $5.3 trillion. that's in his budget. he signed that. we have a lot of the programs that should be undone. give you an example, we had a democrat president back in the '90s, bill clinton, while we had a republican majority in the house and the senate. we did welfare reform. we put the work back into welfare and it was tremendously successful. we decreased the welfare rolls. now, obama's reversed that. now we have it's gone up, the food stamp program now gone up from 28 million families to 47 million. that's just one of the things that can be reversed, that got news this mess to start with. >> gretchen: but senator, why does it appear -- and obviously the election was a result of it -- why does it appear that president obama wins the pr campaign on this entire discussion? >> well, gretchen, i represent oklahoma. he hasn't won up there. >> gretchen: but he's winning it acrossment country. >> well, i know, he's a very persuasive person. that doesn
to talk about comprehensive tax reform and talk about spending cuts and talk about debt and deficit reduction. pulling out an isolated piece like raising rates or taking a mortgage interest deduction or whatever it may be, it doesn't serve a purpose. you have to look at the entire problem. if you don't do that, we're all dead. >> where does norquist fit in? has your own view on the pledge evolved? >> i'm not for increasing tax rates. i'm for reforming the code, raising the base upon which those rates might be applied. i'm not for raising the rates. >> why is this attracting a -- why is revenue in general attracting the share of the debate? i heard complaints that say we're not giving due attention to reform, to entitlements. is it just that taxes are sexy, is that it? >> if the media would stop asking about it we could talk about comprehensive reform of entitlements and of spending. it's a complicated, complex process. if you pull out one part of it and have a debate over that part, you're redirecting america's focus from where it ought to be which is comprehensive reform of spendin
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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